Greece

 Milo Island

  May 2012 

R. Roscoe


in deutsch

Milos Volcanic Field

The greek island of Milos is of almost entirely volcanic origin and whilst the last magmatic activity lies about 90000 years in the past, there are still signs of geothermal activity at the surface. Numerous fantastically colourful landscapes have been formed by volcanic activity and subsequent hydrothermal alteration and further sculpted by erosion. At Paliohori, the cliffs are colourful and fumarolic deposits can be seen at their base. Sarakiniko on the other hand is famous for its white erosionally sculpted tuff formations.

Interestingly, much of Milos, including its highest mountain, Profitis Ilias, were formed in a submarine environment and are now above the surface as a result of tectonic processes which have uplifted most of the terrain at the location of Milos island.

 Greece Milo by R.Roscoe

Profitis Ilias 

Greece Milo by R.Roscoe    Greece Milo by R.Roscoe    Greece Milo by R.Roscoe

Paliohori

 Greece Milo by R.Roscoe    Greece Milo by R.Roscoe    Greece Milo by R.Roscoe

Sarakiniko

 

Greece Milo by R.Roscoe  Fyriplaka    Greece Milo by R.Roscoe   Kleftiko

 

 

Milos is also highly interesting in that one can see the variety of uses that volcanic products can be put to. Obsidian was already collected in Milos thousands of years ago, as was sulfur. More recently, mining on a larger industrial scale was started. Remnants of the Cape Vani Manganese mine and the fascinating Paliorema Sulfur works can be visited. Whilst little but tunnels, gulleys and a few simple buildings remain at Vani, in Paliorema the entire processing machinery remains in place although the site is decaying badly.

 Greece Milo by R.Roscoe     Greece Milo by R.Roscoe

)Greece Milo by R.Roscoe     Greece Milo by R.Roscoe

 Vani

Greece Milo by R.Roscoe     Greece Milo by R.Roscoe     Greece Milo by R.Roscoe

 

Greece Milo by R.Roscoe       Greece Milo by R.Roscoe       Greece Milo by R.Roscoe

Paliorema

Greece Milo by R.Roscoe  

Perlite Processing Facility,  Bentonite mine

The island is relatively small and many of the roads are rough tracks, but even with a normal car and careful driving it is possible to reach the most remote areas. A sense of navigation is however useful approaching Vani due to a lack of signposting in the network of dirt roads.

The landscape is presently being shaped by modern opencast mining of bentonite, perlite and pozzalane. These volcanic products are exported and along with the modest tourist industry on Milos are the main sources of income for the local community. More information can be obtained at the mining museum in Adamas.


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© 2012, Photos and text from Richard Roscoe, last modification 07/12/2012